Tag Archives: modernists

5 Most Creative Modernist Painters

Modernist painting refers to works that artists produced during the 19th and 20th centuries. Although the definitions are somewhat variable, you’ll find that most of the earliest pieces are from the 1860s, with the latest ones offered in the 1970s.

The artists that produced items after the 1970s in this movement are often called “postmodern” or “contemporary.”

Here are the artists you’ll want to get to know from this outstanding period in art history.

1. Pablo Picasso

Picasso is arguably the most influential artist of the 20th century. He refused to follow the past practices, pioneering the idea of cubism while experimenting with sculpture and techniques. He created approximately 1,900 paintings during his career.

2. Vincent van Gogh

This artist could have been the most influential producer of his era. His mental illness and overall health instability led him to commit suicide before the age of 40. In a little over ten years, he created over 2,100 works. Imagine what he could have done with another 20 years!

3. Frida Kahlo

Kahlo abandoned a career in medicine to become an artist after suffering a horrific accident. She would end up going through 35 operations to maintain some semblance of normalcy. Her most famous pieces tend to be self-portraits, but she was also quite influential in the world of surrealism.

4. Claude Monet

Monet gets credit for being the founder of Impressionism. He was always looking for new ways to improve his expressions, whether that be through light, colors, or elements. His water lilies collection is arguably the most famous set ever created by a single artist, with over 250 examples produced.

5. Andy Warhol

Pop Art would be the last significant modernism movement, and Warhol was the most recognizable figure in that state. His masterpiece (outside of the Campbell’s soup cans) is called “Marilyn Diptych,” featuring numerous small profiles of Marilyn Monroe.

Additional artists who could be on this list include Henri Matisse, Jackson Pollock, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Wassily Kandinsky.